Teachers

Michael Prettyman is an artist and scholar of Eastern Religions. He holds a Masters Degree in Theology from the Harvard Divinity School and teaches on the subject of religion and the arts, Asian Religion and philosophy at Hunter College and the CUNY Graduate Center in New York.
Geoff Klock has a doctorate from Oxford and is a professor at BMCC-CUNY. He teaches philosophy, Shakespeare, canonical poetry in English, parables, and film (mostly David Lynch). He is the author of four academic books on things like television shows and superheroes. He has been cited 290 times, including in the New Yorker and the LA Times and made a Hamlet Mash Up that got 57,000 views.
Makeba Lavan is a doctoral candidate at the Graduate Center, CUNY. Generally speaking, her research focuses on (African) American Studies, Speculative Fiction and Popular Culture. She teaches at Lehman College.
Skye C. Cleary PhD MBA is the author of Existentialism and Romantic Love, Associate Director of the Center for New Narratives in Philosophy at Columbia University, and teaches at Columbia, Barnard College, and the City College of New York.
George holds an undergraduate degree from the California Institute of the Arts, a masters degree from Brooklyn College Conservatory, and is currently continuing her studies as a PhD candidate at the CUNY Grad Center. In addition to her composing and conducting, George teaches at Brooklyn College, works at the Hitchcock Institute of American Studies and is the Managing Director for New York's AME.
Vishwa Adluri teaches Philosophy and Religion at Hunter College NY. He specializes in Ancient Greek Philosophy, Ancient Indian Philosophy, Philosophy of Religion, and Myth.
Dena Shottenkirk is a philosophy professor at Brooklyn College and former art critic for both Artforum and Art and America.
Michael Hamburg taught in the New York City high schools for over 33 years. Currently he is a docent and trainer at the Rose Center for Earth and Space at the American Museum of Natural History in NYC.
Jamie Warren has a Ph.D. in American History from Indiana University, and she is an Assistant Professor at BMCC-CUNY where she teaches American history, the history of women and gender, and women’s studies. Her research focuses on slavery in antebellum South with a particular focus on death, the body, and the philosophy of history.
Charles Riley II is the director of the Nassau County Museum of Art, an arts journalist, curator and professor at Clarkson University. He graduated from Princeton and received his Phd from City College of New York. He is the author of thirty-two books on art, architecture and public policy. He recently published Free as Gods (University Press of New England).
Brian Lewis teaches courses on the Black Arts Movement and Art Making and Civic Engagement at the New School. He is the director of programs and education at Exalt, an equitable future for court-involved youth.
Marissa Gutierrez-Vicario is an adjunct lecturer at the City College of New York in the Education and Art Education departments. She is also the Executive Director of Art and Resistance Through Education (ARTE), a non-profit organization that supports young people in amplifying their voices for human rights change through the visual arts.
Ben Abelson is an assistant philosophy professor in the humanities department at Mercy College. His primary research interests are personal identity, the nature of responsibility, the foundations of psychology and psychotherapy as well as the impact of emotions on behavior, the relationship between art and pop culture, and the influence of science fiction on philosophy.
Christopher “Doc” Kelley is an adjunct professor, consciousness hacker, interdisciplinary artist (or Flux-Happener), and Buddhist psychonaut (among other things). He holds a doctorate in Buddhist Studies from Columbia University, where he studied under the guidance of Professor Robert A. F. Thurman, and he currently teaches classes at Eugene Lang College at the New School University.
Maureen T. Matarese is a professor at BMCC. She has a doctorate from Columbia University and is a linguist with a specialization in discourse analysis, sociolinguistics, and applied linguistics. She is the U.S. expert on social work interaction (particularly in homeless settings) and the discourse of street-level bureaucrats.
Manuel Rodeiro teaches in the Philosophy department at Baruch College. He is currently completing his Ph.D. in Philosophy at CUNY Graduate Center and received a JD from Fordham University School of Law. He specializes in socio-political, ethical, and legal philosophy.
Barry Lam is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Vassar College, and executive producer and host of Hi-Phi Nation from Slate, a show about philosophy that turns stories into ideas (www.hiphination.org). His academic interests are in epistemology, philosophy of language, and statistical reasoning.
Heather Aimee (Fisher) O’Neill is an award winning writer, editor, content developer and teacher. She teaches creative writing at CUNY Hunter College and is the Assistant Director of the Sackett Street Writers’ Workshop.
Michelle is a doctoral candidate in Art History at the CUNY Graduate Center, a Curatorial Assistant in the Architecture + Design department at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and an educator in art, architecture, and design histories at several institutions (currently Parsons The New School for Design and The Frick Collection,CUNY’s Baruch College and Harvard’s Gradate School of Design.
Ward Regan has a Ph.D. in Labor and Cultural History from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He teaches history and philosophy at New York University Liberal Studies and Global Liberal Studies Program. He wrote and widely performed his own show, A Paranoid’s Guide to History.
Ted Barrow teaches in Barnard College's Pre-College Program over the summer, focusing on the relationship between art and film in New York City, and has taught art history courses at Baruch, City College, the College of Staten Island, and Brooklyn College. Barrow currently works as the Assistant Curator at the Hudson River Museum and a popular Instagram account about skateboarding (@feedback_ts).
Jessica Rogers writes poetry/prose/essays and conducts experiments with analog photography. By day, she teaches writing and literature at Bronx Community College, CUNY.
Angie Beeman is an Associate Professor of Sociology at Baruch College. Her work focuses on the evolution of racism and how this process affects institutional practices, identities, and interracial organizing. In her past work, she developed the concept of emotional segregation, which she defined as an institutionalized empathetic barrier between European Americans and people of color.
Michael D. Haltenberger has been teaching Comparative Religion at Hunter College for over a decade. His primary interest is the relationship between religion and science and how both affect the way we experience and behave in the world.
Patricia Kim received her MFA from Columbia University and teaches Composition and Literature classes at Baruch College while completing a novel. After graduating with her MSW from Columbia last spring, she now works for the Mental Health Service Corps. (MHSC) as a licensed behavioral health clinician, under the umbrella of the ThriveNYC.
Hakim Mohandas Amani Williams is an Assistant Professor of Africana Studies and Education at Gettysburg College. Hakim's doctorate is in International Educational Development with a focus in Peace Education from Columbia University. His research and writing centers on school/structural violence, educational inequity and youth empowerment.
Lev Moscow has taught International Political Economy at the Beacon school for ten years, as well as courses on the history of the global economy at Florence University of the Arts in Italy.
Maureen Matarese is a professor of Linguistics and Geoff Klock is a Shakespeare and David Lynch obsessive (and also a professor). They make up a wife and husband Think Olio power couple.
Kamau Ware has become a sought-after voice to fill the visual abyss of Black New York history, illustrating powerful stories that exist outside of public consciousness.
Phelim Kine is an adjunct professor at Hunter College and a deputy director in Human Rights Watch’s Asia Division. He has spoken publicly on Asia’s human rights challenges at venues ranging from the European Parliament and the American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong to the Council on Foreign Relations and a hearing of the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission (USCC).
Lawrence Cappello is the author of None of Your Damn Business: A History of Privacy in the United States, due out this September. His essays have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, and The Nation. He is an Assistant Professor of U.S. Legal/Constitutional History at the University of Alabama, and received his PhD in History from the City University of New York.
Massimo Pigliucci is the K.D. Irani Professor of Philosophy at the City College of New York. He is the author of How to Be a Stoic: Using Ancient Philosophy to Live a Modern Life.
Bennett Capers is the Stanley A. August Professor of Law at Brooklyn Law School. His academic interests include the relationship between race, gender, and criminal justice, and he is a prolific writer on these topics.
Jeanne Proust has studied Philosophy and Visual Arts in Bordeaux, Berlin, and Paris. Her research focuses on Théodule Ribot’s Diseases of the Will, both in philosophical and psychological perspectives. While teaching at different universities here in New York, Jeanne is advocating for a widening of philosophical education beyond the frontiers of academia.
Meredith Mowder teaches courses on contemporary art and sound art at Hunter College, CUNY, and Parsons, The New School, and is a Joan Tisch Teaching Fellow at the Whitney Museum of American Art. She specializes in the intersections between art, music, performance, and popular culture in America post-1945.
Sofi Thanhauser is a writer and artist currently living in Brooklyn. She teaches at Pratt Institute and Baruch College.
Lauren Hudson is currently a doctoral candidate in Earth and Environmental Sciences at the CUNY Graduate Center where she writes about anti-capitalist organizing among women in NYC. Her research interests concern how economic subjectivities are created between and among those who perform labor based on solidarity, how their narratives of their work cohere and diverge from dominant discourses.
Fernando Zapata is a doctoral candidate in Philosophy at SUNY Binghamton with interests in ethics and political philosophy; he teaches philosophy courses at Hunter College, CUNY.

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