*Sold Out* The Fear of Leisure

Jeanne Proust at Threes Brewing // Greenpoint

Tue, Oct 22 at 7:30 p.m.   |   90 minutes

Why do we fear leisure and love work so much? In this Olio with philosopher, Jeanne Proust, we will discuss psychological, social, economical and political views that challenge our praising of work over leisure.

​Laziness is what we call a thick concept in philosophy: both descriptive, and evaluative. When we call a person lazy, we are not merely trying to objectively pick out a factual behavior. We are judging and indeed, blaming that person's behavior. After exploring bits of history around the idea of laziness and its conceptual cousins like sloth, idleness, or leisure, we will discuss psychological, social, economical and political views that challenge our praising of work over leisure. Why do we despise lazy people? Are there types of laziness we could differentiate? Could we learn how to reevaluate our time by not being so afraid of wasting it?

Bertrand Russel, in Praise of Idleness:

"Like most of my generation, I was brought up on the saying “Satan finds some mischief still for idle hands to do.” Being a highly virtuous child, I believed all that I was told and acquired a conscience which has kept me working hard down to the present moment. But although my conscience has controlled my actions, my opinions have undergone a revolution. I think that there is far too much work done in the world, that immense harm is caused by the belief that work is virtuous, and that what needs to be preached in modern industrial countries is quite different from what always has been preached".

Teacher: Jeanne Proust

Jeanne Proust's research focuses on Théodule Ribot’s Diseases of the Will, both in philosophical and psychological perspectives. While teaching at different universities here in New York, Jeanne is advocating for a widening of philosophical education beyond the academic frontiers.


Venue: Threes Brewing // Greenpoint

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Think Olio is here to put the liberation back into the liberal arts.

Classically, the liberal arts, were the education considered essential for a free person to take an active part in civic life. To counter a humanities that has been institutionalized and dehumanized we infuse critical thinking, openness, playfulness, and compassion into our learning experience.

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Liaisons Host an Olio

Olio: A miscellaneous collection of art and literature.