OlioNote Release Party // Death, Paint By Numbers, & Plato's Cave

None at Terminus Recording

Fri, Jul 15 at 9 p.m.   |   90 minutes

THE HISTORY OF DEATH IN AMERICA — by Jamie Warren

Despite the vast array of different cultural practices and beliefs surrounding death, at least one thing stands out as universal among all known societies and perhaps throughout all of human history: no society has ever regarded the dead body as meaningless material. We all, it seems, have a deep need to tend to our dead. Yet, precisely because of this shared ubiquitous value, the dead body has served as a site of power, oppression, and resistance.

CEZANNES of SUBURBIA: The Midcentury Craze for Paint by Number — by Amanda Hallay

In the American 1950s, the birth of Abstract Expressionism coupled with a craze for a fantasy Rive Gauche (cue: artists in berets creating avant-garde masterpieces on the banks of The Seine) saw a genuine belief that we all had an ‘artist within’ who was dying to get out! Sadly the ‘artist within’ most of us wasn’t very talented, but help was on hand. Tapping into this almost pathological desire to create art (and his own need to get rid of surplice paint), engineer and paint manufacture Max S. Klein teamed up with commercial artist Dan Robbins and launched ‘Paint by Number’, each kit containing a canvas covered in light blue numbered shapes, each number corresponding to a tiny, plastic tub of paint. Paintbrush included! Promising to “Bring out the Rembrandt” in everyone, Paint by Number was a genuine cultural phenomenon, the resulting ‘masterpieces’ both hilarious and poignant, telling as they do the cultural story of Midcentury America.

THE PEOPLE VS OSCAR WILDE: Aestheticism, Popular Culture, Evil — by Geoff Klock

Oscar Wilde popularized the idea that Beauty, rather than Truth or Goodness, should be the aim of art -- and by extension pop culture. It was an idea that gave us stunning paintings that are just splashes of color and movies that are pure roller coasters. But did removing accuracy and moral aims from art lead us into our current predicament where we blame stories for preaching violence, patriarchy, racism and sexism?

Space is limited.

Teacher: Jamie Warren, Geoff Klock, & Amanda Hallay
Venue: Terminus Recording

What is Think Olio?


Think Olio is here to put the liberation back into the liberal arts.

Classically, the liberal arts, were the education considered essential for a free person to take an active part in civic life. To counter a humanities that has been institutionalized and dehumanized we infuse critical thinking, openness, playfulness, and compassion into our learning experience.

Read more about our mission, our story, and how we are doing this.

Scenius Membership

If Friday night lectures, museum field trips, and living room salons sound like your kind of thing, then you've found your people. We can't wait to welcome you to the Think Olio Scenius. More info


Other Upcoming Olios


New Toys and New Tyrants: Capitalism and the Rise of Platform Economics

Location: at Online

Teacher: Rob Larson

June 4, 2020, 8 p.m.

A Dialogue: Buddhism and the Stoics

Location: at Online

Teacher: Bhante Kusala & Michael Prettyman

June 5, 2020, 8 p.m.

Seeing the Subconscious: Mindfulness, Psychology, and the Road to Healing Racism

Location: at Online

Teacher: Darryl Aiken-Afam & Robin Schlenger

June 7, 2020, 7 p.m.

Internet Omnipresence & Critical Thinking

Location: at Online

Teacher: Jeanne Proust

June 8, 2020, 8 p.m.

Escape From The City

Location: at Online

Teacher: Ted Barrow

June 10, 2020, 8 p.m.

Progressives, Radicals & Well-Meaning Liberals

Location: at Online

Teacher: Angie Beeman

June 11, 2020, 8 p.m.

Plato Goes East: The Republic and The Bhagavad Gita

Location: at Online

Teacher: Vishwa Adluri

June 14, 2020, noon

Socialism, A Day in the Life

Location: at Online

Teacher: Danny Katch

June 15, 2020, 8 p.m.


Stay in Touch


Instagram Mailing List Contact

Get Involved


Liaisons Host an Olio

Olio: A miscellaneous collection of art and literature.